Evictions

Many local laws and courts have been affected by COVID-19. Please use the search for legal help tool to find a legal aid organization or self help center near you for accurate information and more support.

Most Frequently Viewed Resources

What should a tenant do if his or her apartment needs repairs? Can a landlord force a tenant to move? How many days notice does a tenant have to give a landlord before the tenant moves? Can a landlord raise a tenant’s rent? California Tenants—A Guide to Residential Tenants’ and Landlords’ Rights and Responsibilities answers these questions and many others.

Read about where to file your lawsuit or case. Information on jurisdiction and venue.

If you cannot afford the filing fee or other court costs, you may qualify to have these fees and costs waived by the court.

ADR is usually less formal, less expensive, and less time-consuming than a trial.

Only basic information from this student-run organization.

This resource will help you understand your responsibilities as the tenant in case your landlord has started the eviction process.

This video clip provides information regarding the options available to resolve disputes between landlords and tenants. The video clip consists of five chapters organized in an automatic playlist.

Whatever the reason, you have the right to represent yourself, to be your own lawyer in all cases in California.

The Constitution; Executive and Administrative Laws; County, Appellate, Supreme Court, and Federal Districts; State Legislation; and Legal Guides.

If your landlord wants to evict you, he or she must file a court case against you called an “unlawful detainer.” The landlord must have someone serve you (give you) the court papers called a “Summons” and “Complaint.”

This section will give you general guidelines for how to best prepare yourself for court.

This resource provides general instructions regarding the eviction process inside or outside the court.

Such as security deposits, rent increases, roommates, and evictions.

No. It is illegal for a landlord to lockout a tenant (renter), remove a tenant’s belongings, cut off utilities (such as water or electricity), or remove outside windows or doors in order to force a tenant to leave.

Rent Control, Buyouts, Condo & TIC Conversions, Habitability & Repairs, Harassment by Landlord, Sales of Buildings, Security Deposits, Short-Term Rentals

Alphabetical Listing of Resources

Check out California Court's FAQ's on Eviction.

Protections for residents and causes for evictions.

The law limits excessive rent, reasons for evictions, and rent increases.

Topics such as: repair issues; security deposits; interest on security deposits, and the rent board fee; eviction issues; landlord petitions and passthroughs tenant petitions; annual allowable rent increases and banked rent increases; hearings, mediations and appeals; utility passthroughs; water revenue bond passthroughs.