Domestic Violence

Many local laws and courts have been affected by COVID-19. Please use the search for legal help tool to find a legal aid organization or self help center near you for accurate information and more support.

Most Frequently Viewed Resources

If you cannot afford the filing fee or other court costs, you may qualify to have these fees and costs waived by the court.

Read about where to file your lawsuit or case. Information on jurisdiction and venue.

There are laws that deal with custody and visitation rights of parents in cases of domestic violence.

Safe at Home is California's address confidentiality program administered by the California Secretary of State"s office. The program, which provides a free post office box and mail forwarding service, is designed to help victims and survivors of domestic violence.

This section will give you general guidelines for how to best prepare yourself for court.

Explore the tabs below to learn a few of the common types of abuse so you can better identify them.

The Constitution; Executive and Administrative Laws; County, Appellate, Supreme Court, and Federal Districts; State Legislation; and Legal Guides.

This page includes general information about domestic violence in tribal law, information on tribal protection orders, and links to other online resources for domestic violence on tribal land.

Call (800) 799 - 7233 for Trained advocates are available to talk confidentially with anyone experiencing domestic violence, seeking resources or information, or questioning unhealthy aspects of their relationship. TTY: (800) 787 - 3224 and Videophone (855) 812 - 11

Whatever the reason, you have the right to represent yourself, to be your own lawyer in all cases in California.

Everyone inside the U.S. has certain legal rights, regardless of your immigration status.

A safety plan is a personalized, practical plan that can help you avoid dangerous situations and know the best way to react when you"re in danger.

A restraining order protects someone from being physically or sexually abused, threatened, stalked, or harassed.

This resource will help you understand how the California Court defines domestic violence, restraining orders, where to get help and find other resources.

Documentation of your partner"s abusive behaviors can be an important component of your case.

The purpose of this Email Hotline is for WomensLaw to provide basic legal information, referrals, and emotional support.

The court can help protect people who have been abused or threatened with abuse by someone you dated, lived with, or are related to.

This resource defines stalking, cyberstalking and online harassment under the law, statistics about who is affected, California and Federal Law on stalking, tips and resources for victims.

This map is a useful tool for finding domestic violence organizations in your community who are Members of the Partnership.

If you have a problem or just want to talk with another teen who understands, then this is the right place for you! Call, Text, or Email. Check out "Ask TEEN LINE", find resources in Youth Yellow Pages, or join conversations with other teens on message boards.

ADR is usually less formal, less expensive, and less time-consuming than a trial.

Immigration, family, public benefits, criminal laws, access a broad range of victim services without regard to immigration status.

List of documents required for the application process.

Tips to prepare and what to do when you're at the court.

Up to 99% of domestic violence victims experience economic abuse during an abusive relationship, and finances are often cited as the biggest barrier to leaving an abusive relationship. This resource describes what economic abuse is and what to do about it.

Immigrant victims are protected by federal law.

This resource by the Women's Law organization will assist you in answering the following questions: What is domestic violence? Who does domestic violence happen to? What are the laws against domestic violence and can they help me?

A comprehensive and practical guide for everyday people on how to end interpersonal violence in their community. The C.I. Toolkit gives in depth how-tos on supporting survivors of sexualized/gendered violence, organizing community accountability processes and interventions, and working together to build a future without violence.

The court can help to prevent acts of violence with restraining orders, forms, resources and FAQ.

A list of resources on using technology with safety tips, information, and privacy strategies for survivors.

Identify abuse and know your relationship type.

These pages provide tips to help keep you as safe as possible while you are still in an abusive relationship, when you are preparing to leave, and after you have left.

Alphabetical Listing of Resources

Domestic violence and sexual assault survivors often need to take time off from their jobs to go to court to testify against a batterer or perpetrator or to get a restraining order to protect themselves and their children. Under California Labor Code 230, which is part of the “Survivors of Domestic Violence Employment Leave Act,” survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault are entitled to job-guaranteed time off from work to testify in court as a witness or to ensure the health and safety of themselves and their children. Read more at the link below.

This resource includes information about reporting and receiving help for domestic violence on military bases. What are the differences between the military justice system and the civil justice system? What is an MPO (Military Order of Protection)? Are MPO's and civil protective orders valid wherever I go?

Domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking survivors are often afraid of being harmed by an abuser, perpetrator of sexual assault or stalker while at work or are harmed at work by these individuals.

A practical handbook for family members and anyone seeking to address the child sexual abuse in their lives and in the lives of those around them.
This resource shares how to intervene in ways that support the person who experienced sexual abuse to heal from the impacts, and how to respond in a way that allows and requires the person who sexually abused a child to take accountability, and to truly transform their behavior.

As a battered spouse, child or parent, you may file an immigrant visa petition under the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), as amended by the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA).

This page includes information about Military Protective Orders and their protection on military bases

Sometimes, the best way to evade an abuser and reduce the risk of further violence may be to relocate and establish a new identity. Following these changes, getting a new Social Security number may also be helpful.

We protect the rights of survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking to keep their jobs, take time off, and obtain accommodations while seeking safety or medical or legal help. We represent low-wage workers, provide community education, and advocate for policy change to expand survivors’ workplace rights. We provide free confidential legal advice through our Survive Helpline: 888-864-8335

A list of affordable housing facilities and housing service programs for Santa Clara county.