Debt Collection, Garnishment, Repossession

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Most Frequently Viewed Resources

Read about where to file your lawsuit or case. Information on jurisdiction and venue.

If you cannot afford the filing fee or other court costs, you may qualify to have these fees and costs waived by the court.

What happens in the vehicle repossession process.

Most reputable credit counselors are non-profit and offer services at local offices, online, or on the phone.

What do I have to do to get the judge to keep creditors from obtaining the exempt funds in my bank account?

This guide offers suggestions to help you get results when you have a problem with the purchase of goods or services. It explains the proper way to make a complaint, and also discusses using government agencies, consumer groups, lawyers and small claims court. A sample complaint letter and a list of compliant-handling agencies are included.

Need help with managing your debt? Take a look at a list of debtor education agencies in California.

How debt collection works, regulations, common concerns addressed by the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA), and debts you do not recognize or remember.

Your rights dealing with repossession agencies and their practices.

The Constitution; Executive and Administrative Laws; County, Appellate, Supreme Court, and Federal Districts; State Legislation; and Legal Guides.

State offices, district attorneys (DA), and government regulators.

This site will hand-pick videos based on your issue.

Wage garnishment occurs when an employer withholds the earnings of an individual for the payment of a debt as the result of a court order or other equitable procedure.

Whatever the reason, you have the right to represent yourself, to be your own lawyer in all cases in California.

Options for resolving debts, before or after court involvement.

Types of property: community, separate, quasi-community, and mixed community.

Up to 99% of domestic violence victims experience economic abuse during an abusive relationship, and finances are often cited as the biggest barrier to leaving an abusive relationship. This resource describes what economic abuse is and what to do about it.

If you or someone you know is in financial hot water, consider these options: self-help using realistic budgeting and other techniques; debt relief services, like credit counseling or debt settlement from a reputable organization; debt consolidation; or bankruptcy.

Learn about civil cases that involve financial issues, including contract disputes, property damage, injury, unpaid debt, and bankruptcy.

This section will give you general guidelines for how to best prepare yourself for court.

You can also call at 877-FTC-HELP.

Deciding whether to respond to the lawsuit; responding to the lawsuit; filing your papers in court; after you file your response; counter-suing the plaintiff; and steps in the court process.

How to avoid a debt collection lawsuit and what the legal process is.

Alphabetical Listing of Resources

Read about what you need to know about car repossession in California. This includes what repossession agents can and can't do, what type of notices you'll get, and what to do after a car repossession.

Facing debt collection action? This system will creates several letters and basic court filings.

The Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA) prohibits debt collectors from using abusive, unfair, or deceptive practices to collect from you.

It takes a little patience and knowledge of the dispute settlement procedures provided by the Fair Credit Billing Act (FCBA).

You have rights when it comes to practices of creditors and agents.

The National Consumer Law Center's Student Loan Borrower Assistance Project provides resources and information on all things student loans, including repayment options, loan forgiveness and cancellation, and bankruptcy.

Who is responsible? What are collectors allowed to do?

Your home; adjusters and contractors; when picking a contractor; when you get your settlement; creditors, bills and budgeting; and watch out for fraud.

If you have old debts, collectors may not be able to sue you to collect on them.