Discrimination For Immigration Status or National Origin

Other Immigration Problems

Information for Fee Waiver

Ask for a Fee Waiver if you can't afford filing fees

Facts About National Origin Discrimination

No one can be denied equal employment opportunity because of birthplace, ancestry, culture, linguistic characteristics common to a specific ethnic group, or accent.

Language Discrimination

Language discrimination occurs when a person is treated differently because of her native language or other characteristics of her language skills. If you need further legal advice or assistance, or think you may have suffered language-based discrimination, please call the Language Rights Information Line (800) 864-1664, a free service of Legal Aid at Work.

Appeals and Motions: Questions and Answers

You may file an appeal on some unfavorable decisions to the USCIS Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) or the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA).

Find Legal Assistance with Your Immigration Case Near You

This interactive map and search engine that will help you find legal assistance near you.

Find USCIS Field Offices Near You

Field Offices handle scheduled interviews on non-asylum related applications.

Proving Work Authorization and Reverification

Since 1986, the immigration law requires employers to only hire workers who have authorization by the U.S. government to work in this country. The law requires employers to check (verify) the identity and work eligibility of each employee. If you believe you have been discriminated against on the basis of immigration status or national origin, you may be able to file a charge against your employer. Your union or an advocate from an immigrant rights group may be able to help you with this charge. You can contact them at 1-800-255-7688 or, for TDD 1-800- 237-2515 (both numbers are free).

Work Authorization and Verification for Refugees and Aslyee

To legally hire any employee in the United States, an employer must be able to verify that the applicant is eligible to work in the United States. You must prove that you are eligible to work. Employers are required to complete a Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification, to record verification that you showed the employer documents that prove you are authorized to work in the United States.

Appeals and Motions: Questions and Answers

You may file an appeal on some unfavorable decisions to the USCIS Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) or the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA).

Find Legal Assistance with Your Immigration Case Near You

This interactive map and search engine that will help you find legal assistance near you.

Facts About National Origin Discrimination

No one can be denied equal employment opportunity because of birthplace, ancestry, culture, linguistic characteristics common to a specific ethnic group, or accent.

Find USCIS Field Offices Near You

Field Offices handle scheduled interviews on non-asylum related applications.

Information for Fee Waiver

Ask for a Fee Waiver if you can't afford filing fees

Language Discrimination

Language discrimination occurs when a person is treated differently because of her native language or other characteristics of her language skills. If you need further legal advice or assistance, or think you may have suffered language-based discrimination, please call the Language Rights Information Line (800) 864-1664, a free service of Legal Aid at Work.

Proving Work Authorization and Reverification

Since 1986, the immigration law requires employers to only hire workers who have authorization by the U.S. government to work in this country. The law requires employers to check (verify) the identity and work eligibility of each employee. If you believe you have been discriminated against on the basis of immigration status or national origin, you may be able to file a charge against your employer. Your union or an advocate from an immigrant rights group may be able to help you with this charge. You can contact them at 1-800-255-7688 or, for TDD 1-800- 237-2515 (both numbers are free).

Work Authorization and Verification for Refugees and Aslyee

To legally hire any employee in the United States, an employer must be able to verify that the applicant is eligible to work in the United States. You must prove that you are eligible to work. Employers are required to complete a Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification, to record verification that you showed the employer documents that prove you are authorized to work in the United States.

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