Restraining Orders

Most Frequently Viewed Resources

Read about where to file your lawsuit or case. Information on jurisdiction and venue.

If you cannot afford the filing fee or other court costs, you may qualify to have these fees and costs waived by the court.

Whatever the reason, you have the right to represent yourself, to be your own lawyer in all cases in California.

The Constitution; Executive and Administrative Laws; County, Appellate, Supreme Court, and Federal Districts; State Legislation; and Legal Guides.

The purpose of this Email Hotline is for WomensLaw to provide basic legal information, referrals, and emotional support.

This section will give you general guidelines for how to best prepare yourself for court.

Civil harassment is abuse, threats of abuse, stalking, sexual assault, or serious harassment by someone you have not dated and do NOT have a close relationship with, like a neighbor, a roommate, or a friend (that you have never dated). It is also civil harassment if the abuse is from a family member (like an uncle or aunt, a niece or nephew, or a cousin).

You can request a free interpreter to be with you in court.

A court interpreter verbally translates (called “interpreting”) everything the judge and others say from spoken English into your primary language, and everything you say back into spoken English.

This resource has the answers to commonly asked questions about court interpreters, including how to ask for one.

A restraining order protects someone from being physically or sexually abused, threatened, stalked, or harassed.

This map is a useful tool for finding domestic violence organizations in your community who are Members of the Partnership.

This resource by the Women's Law organization will assist you in answering the following questions: What is domestic violence? Who does domestic violence happen to? What are the laws against domestic violence and can they help me?

A domestic violence restraining order (DVRO) is a civil court order that is signed by a judge and tells the abuser to stop the abuse or face serious legal consequences. This resource provides basic information on domestic violence retraining orders, who can get them, how to get them, and what happens after a hearing.

The legal way to give formal notice is to have the other side "served" with a copy of the paperwork that you have filed with the court.

This resource will help you understand how the California Court defines domestic violence, restraining orders, where to get help and find other resources.

Alphabetical Listing of Resources

This resource defines stalking, cyberstalking and online harassment under the law, statistics about who is affected, California and Federal Law on stalking, tips and resources for victims.

The court can help protect people who have been abused or threatened with abuse by someone you dated, lived with, or are related to.

A comprehensive and practical guide for everyday people on how to end interpersonal violence in their community. The C.I. Toolkit gives in depth how-tos on supporting survivors of sexualized/gendered violence, organizing community accountability processes and interventions, and working together to build a future without violence.

This page includes general information about domestic violence in tribal law, information on tribal protection orders, and links to other online resources for domestic violence on tribal land.

A safety plan is a personalized, practical plan that can help you avoid dangerous situations and know the best way to react when you"re in danger.

Tips to prepare and what to do when you're at the court.

You can ask for a firearms restraining order against a close family member if you are afraid they may hurt themselves, or another person, with a gun.

When to call the police and what can the police do if the abuser violates the restraining order.

Call (800) 799 - 7233 for Trained advocates are available to talk confidentially with anyone experiencing domestic violence, seeking resources or information, or questioning unhealthy aspects of their relationship. TTY: (800) 787 - 3224 and Videophone (855) 812 - 11

There is most likely has an expiration (end) date. If you are still concerned for your safety or want your restraining order to stay in place, you have to "renew" it, which makes it last longer and gives it a new end date.

One way to try to stop someone from harassing you is to file for a civil harassment restraining order.

These pages provide tips to help keep you as safe as possible while you are still in an abusive relationship, when you are preparing to leave, and after you have left.

If you have a problem or just want to talk with another teen who understands, then this is the right place for you! Call, Text, or Email. Check out "Ask TEEN LINE", find resources in Youth Yellow Pages, or join conversations with other teens on message boards.

Getting a restraining order to protect yourself is not just for adults or people who are married. Many states understand that young people are experiencing abuse, and have made sure that their laws allow teens and young adults to be protected.

The Basics Everyone Should Know has some basic information to help you think about what you want to do about violence. No matter what your familiarity is with the topic of interpersonal violence, including domestic violence or sexual assault, you may find it useful to read through the Basics section. The information presented here is different from the kind of basic domestic violence or sexual assault information offered in other books, websites and community education materials.

This resource is part of the larger Creative Interventions Toolkit, which can be found here: https://www.lawhelpca.org/index.php/Resource/creative-intervention-toolkit