Juvenile Delinquency

Most Frequently Viewed Resources

If you cannot afford the filing fee or other court costs, you may qualify to have these fees and costs waived by the court.

Read about where to file your lawsuit or case. Information on jurisdiction and venue.

This section will give you general guidelines for how to best prepare yourself for court.

Whatever the reason, you have the right to represent yourself, to be your own lawyer in all cases in California.

The Constitution; Executive and Administrative Laws; County, Appellate, Supreme Court, and Federal Districts; State Legislation; and Legal Guides.

The juvenile court gets involved in the lives of children when there are concerns that a parent is not able to keep his or her child safe from abuse or neglect (and the court starts a juvenile dependency case), or minors are accused of breaking the law.

You can request a free interpreter to be with you in court.

A court interpreter verbally translates (called “interpreting”) everything the judge and others say from spoken English into your primary language, and everything you say back into spoken English.

This resource has the answers to commonly asked questions about court interpreters, including how to ask for one.

As a student, you have rights at school: dress codes & uniforms, student expression, searches of students, school discipline, cell phone privacy, LGBTQ, pregnant & parenting students, social media, foster youth, file a complaint.

Alphabetical Listing of Resources

This video is designed to help youth, their parents, and victims of juvenile crime understand delinquency court.

Fighting, gangs, school attendance, juvenile court.

There are many ways in which your immigration status - whether you"re a green card holder or undocumented - can impact your ability to get a job, go to college, or even remain in the United States.

Answers to questions about orders to pay restitution.

Your rights as a parent within the juvenile justice system.

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) young people in the juvenile justice system, like all people in state custody, have clearly established civil rights under the U. S. Constitution, state and federal statutes and regulations, and agency policy