Child Abuse/Neglect

Most Frequently Viewed Resources

Read about where to file your lawsuit or case. Information on jurisdiction and venue.

If you cannot afford the filing fee or other court costs, you may qualify to have these fees and costs waived by the court.

Whatever the reason, you have the right to represent yourself, to be your own lawyer in all cases in California.

The Constitution; Executive and Administrative Laws; County, Appellate, Supreme Court, and Federal Districts; State Legislation; and Legal Guides.

This section will give you general guidelines for how to best prepare yourself for court.

Guardianships, dependency proceedings, getting a child out of a shelter, visitation rights of grandparents, when permanent custody is necessary, adoption, foster care, public benefits, relative caregiver options chart, and school issues.

There are laws that deal with custody and visitation rights of parents in cases of domestic violence.

The juvenile court gets involved in the lives of children when there are concerns that a parent is not able to keep his or her child safe from abuse or neglect (and the court starts a juvenile dependency case), or minors are accused of breaking the law.

As a battered spouse, child or parent, you may file an immigrant visa petition under the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), as amended by the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA).

Alphabetical Listing of Resources

Child Protective Services (CPS) serves abused and neglected children and their families. For more information about CPS, their referral process, and resources, please visit this site.

Find the phone numbers and hours of a CPS office near you.

If you have been taking care of a child who has been declared a dependent of the juvenile court, you may want to be more involved in the child"s court case and consider becoming a de facto parent.

You can request a free interpreter to be with you in court.

A court interpreter verbally translates (called “interpreting”) everything the judge and others say from spoken English into your primary language, and everything you say back into spoken English.

This resource has the answers to commonly asked questions about court interpreters, including how to ask for one.

The California Courts' website offers detailed information about who can become legal guardians, guardians" rights and responsibilities, and how to become a guardian for a child in juvenile dependency court.

If you have a problem or just want to talk with another teen who understands, then this is the right place for you! Call, Text, or Email. Check out "Ask TEEN LINE", find resources in Youth Yellow Pages, or join conversations with other teens on message boards.